Gender

In many soci­eties, deeply embed­ded gen­der inequal­i­ties in roles, sta­tus and rights ren­der women dis­pro­por­tion­ately vul­ner­a­ble to cli­mate change.

In many soci­eties, deeply embed­ded gen­der inequal­i­ties in roles, sta­tus and rights ren­der women dis­pro­por­tion­ately vul­ner­a­ble to cli­mate change. Inte­grate Cli­mate works to address the causes of gender-based cli­mate vul­ner­a­bil­ity.

Cli­mate change affects com­mu­nity gardening

Despite play­ing piv­otal roles in pro­duc­tion and repro­duc­tion, women often have less access to eco­nomic resources, employ­ment, edu­ca­tion, infor­ma­tion and tech­nol­ogy, and are excluded from decision-making processes that affect their lives. Par­tic­u­larly in poorer soci­eties, the sec­tors dom­i­nated by women — such as food pro­duc­tion, domes­tic fuel and water, sub­sis­tence agri­cul­ture and infor­mal employ­ment — suf­fer the worst cli­mate impacts.

Such fac­tors greatly heighten women’s expo­sure to climate-related risks, yet at the same time severely con­strain their abil­ity to deal with adverse cli­mate effects, or par­tic­i­pate in solutions.

” It is increas­ingly evi­dent that women are at the cen­tre of the cli­mate change chal­lenge. Women are dis­pro­por­tion­ately affected by cli­mate change impacts, such as droughts, floods and other extreme weather events, but they also have a crit­i­cal role in com­bat­ting cli­mate change.” UNFCCC

Gender-focussed cli­mate responses are cen­tral to empow­er­ing women, their house­holds and com­mu­ni­ties to become cli­mate resilient.

Inte­grate Cli­mate works to address the causes of gender-based cli­mate vul­ner­a­bil­ity. We ensure that the dif­fer­ent needs, pri­or­i­ties, con­straints and capa­bil­i­ties of women and men are incor­po­rated into mit­i­ga­tion and adap­ta­tion strate­gies. We recog­nise women as impor­tant agents of change, and sup­port their mean­ing­ful par­tic­i­pa­tion at all lev­els of inter­ven­tion and decision-making.